While making his reputation as London's leading society portrait photographer in the late Edwardian era, Hoppé regularly left his Kensington studio to make photographs of British street life. These pictures, poignant and funny at the same time, explored certain ideas about society, class, and human typology. Hoppé’s progressive, integrative vision of the English is an examination of a culture in transition. As fissures in the once-rigid class structure were tested by large-scale immigration turning Britain into a highly multicultural nation, Hoppé was making its collective portrait. Hoppé's photographs show Britain with one foot planted firmly in the past and another reaching toward the future.

Exhibitions viewPublications LinkPress View

London, 1937

London, 1937

London, 1934

London, 1934

London, 1932

London, 1935

Surrey, 1935

West Sussex, 1935

Oxford, 1935

London, c. 1935

London, 1935

London, 1934

Stuffed Bird, c.1939

London, 1934

London, 1935

London, 1932

London, 1933

London, 1935

London, 1932

Somerset, c.1940



1814 Magazine, April 2011 (print | blog)