For February and most of March 1930, Hoppé and his son Frank traveled throughout New Zealand’s north and south islands extolling the beauty of the country. They also found the people uncannily familiar. “So like that of the Old Country is the New Zealander's speech and outlook, that I felt I was in England again.” In his usual encyclopedic fashion Hoppé documented the primary cities of Wellington, Queenstown, Christchurch, Dunedin, and Auckland observing both the traditional European architecture and the traditional decorative carving incorporated into dwellings of the indigenous Maori peoples. Similarly diverse were his typological portraits of New Zealanders showing the true multicultural mix of the young country. The highlight of his visit was New Zealand’s National Parks. “Its alpine scenery equaled anything I had seen in the Rockies or Switzerland, if not quite as grand as the Dolomites in the Tyrol. But for sheer grandeur, Milford Sound surpasses anything I have photographed in my travels: a natural setting for Wagnerian Opera. While I was there, the Viking Sagas persisted in my mind and I tried to capture something of their atmosphere in my pictures.” Hoppé remarked about the purity of the light and how it helped produce perfect exposures balanced of contrast and tone, enabling the making of some of his most remarkable landscapes. For a few short weeks New Zealand’s alpine landscape became to Hoppé what the High Sierras was to his peer, Ansel Adams.

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F. Joseph Glacier, 1930

Milford Sound, 1930

Milford Sound, 1930

F. Joseph Glacier, 1930

Thompson Sound, 1930

Whakawerawera, 1930

Obincenutu Village, 1930

Rotorua, 1930

Auckland, 1930

Maori Woman, 1930

Maori Woman, 1930

Maori, 1930

Mr. Loug, 1930

Christchurch, 1930

Auckland, 1930

Wellington, 1930

S.S. Ulimorau, 1930

Wellington, 1930

Old Auckland, 1930

Dunedin, 1930